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Are we treating Jesus with contempt?

Are we treating Jesus with contempt?

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Am we treating Jesus with contempt? Now that is a tough question. I don’t really want to think about it. Why does Jesus ask such tough questions?

Yet, if I am nullifying what Jesus wants to be happening, is that not contempt? If I don’t help the poor or those in prison, is that not contempt?

Jesus is clear that if I don’t help them, I am evil and going to spend my eternal life in “fiery hell”.

And Jesus said to them, “Elijah does first come and restore all things. And yet how is it written of the Son of Man that He will suffer many things and be treated with contempt? (Mar 9:12 NASB)

Who should I give to?

It is a challenge. I see the homeless. Do I give them some money? Won’t they just use it to buy drugs or booze? Why don’t they have a job, I think. I feel justified in not giving.

Jesus says ‘Yes’ it is your duty to give. It isn’t my job to judge why they are begging. God’s goal for me is to give. That is all I need to know.

What does Jesus think? This may run afoul of the “official stances” of the homeless social services organizations. They have great reasons for their logic. That isn’t what Jesus challenges us to do. I am going to follow Jesus.

What does it mean to be “poor in spirit”?

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Happy in Jesus

Happy (aka Blessed) are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” ~Jesus

Source: Matthew 5:3 (English Standard Version)

What does it mean to be “poor in spirit”? Poor in spirit means that you feel you have no moral riches and are in need.  You feel you need a ‘spiritual’ life. ‘Poor’ (πτωχός) used in this verse means ‘reduced to being a beggar’. Am I begging for a rich spiritual life?

First I need to recognize I need what I don’t have. To be ‘poor in spirit’ is to acknowledge my spiritual poverty, indeed my spiritual bankruptcy, before God. For I have missed God’s goal (aka sin), under the holy wrath of God, and deserving nothing but the judgment of God.

I have nothing to offer, nothing to plead, nothing with which to buy the favour of heaven.

Where is our treasure? What is important to us?

Wealth

Where is our treasure? What is important to us? Is Jesus our Master?

Jesus told us to “store up for yourselves treasures in heaven” (Matthew 6:20). He linked this command to the desire of our hearts: “Where your treasure is, there your heart will be also” (Matthew 6:21).

How should we treat the poor?

In both the Old and New Testaments, we see God’s desire for His children to show compassion to the poor and needy. Jesus said that the poor would always be with us (Matthew 26:11; Mark 14:7).

I need to care for the poor. There is no other conclusion I can come to. This isn’t something I can delegate.

Why did Jesus become poor for us?

GenerosityAs the Son of God, Jesus the Messiah had all the riches of our Father. Yet He chose to give it all away.

Jesus did it for us. He did it so we could share the riches of our Father as well.

It is His nature to be generous. His generosity is contagious.

Jesus loves to give to us. God, like any father, delights in making things happen for us even if it means a sacrifice on His part. God sacrificed His Son for us.

Now that is love.

God’s goal for us is to be generous, like He is. Generosity is contagious.

You are familiar with the generosity of our Master, Jesus the Messiah. Rich as he was, he gave it all away for us—in one stroke he became poor and we became rich.

2 Corinthians 8:8-9

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Too poor to be able to buy the sacrificial lamb!

Image result for jesus moneyJesus is born. We all know the story.

What may not be clear is that apparently Mary and Joseph couldn’t afford a sheep for the sacrifice. As allowed, they substituted the less expensive turtledoves or pigeons.

Those in better circumstances were commanded to bring a lamb of the first year for a burnt-offering, and a turtle-dove, or a young pigeon, for a sin-offering. It is evident, from the offering they made, that although Joseph and Mary were of the seed royal, they were in very lean circumstances.

What Does the Bible Say about Poverty and the Poor? 

Jesus wants us to help the poor. Want to go deeper into this subject? Check out John D. Barry’s new book, Jesus’ Economy: A Biblical View of Poverty, the Currency of Love, and a Pattern for Lasting Change. Shane Claiborne calls it, “a beautiful vision for a world where everyone has enough.” Robert D. Lupton says it is “a fine handbook for practical mission work.”

John D. Barry is a Bible scholar, pastor, and the CEO of Jesus’ Economy, a nonprofit creating jobs and churches in the developing world. On JesusEconomy.org, people can shop fair trade and give directly to a cause they’re passionate about. John’s new book is Jesus’ Economy: A Biblical View of Poverty, the Currency of Love, and a Pattern for Lasting Change.

The poor are near and dear to God’s heart. How we treat the impoverished is a major concern throughout the Bible, from Genesis to Revelation. You simply cannot have the gospel of Jesus and neglect the call to care for impoverished, marginalized, and outcast — those on the underside of power.

But what does the “whole counsel of God” have to say about the poor, poverty, and how we address it (Acts 20:27)? It’s impossible in an article format to cover comprehensively what the Bible says about poverty, but here are seven major themes that have emerged from my research on poverty for my recent book, Jesus’ Economy: A Biblical View of Poverty, the Currency of Love, and a Pattern for Lasting Change.

Read more here:

What Does the Bible Say about Poverty and the Poor? – Topical Studies



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Everything Jesus had to say about the homeless, wealth, prosperity, poverty, riches, the poor, the needy and giving

Jesus had a lot to say about the homeless, wealth, prosperity, poverty, riches, the poor, the needy and giving. Here is a compilation of everything I have found. It is worth reading this to get a sense of what Jesus thinks and what he requires of us.

There is a lot of confusion among the followers of Jesus about much of this. When you read it all, you will get a sense of the mind of Jesus.

My suggestion is to read through this more than once. You may want to read it once a week for a while.

What Jesus tells us needs to be thoroughly absorbed. This is foundational to the radical world Jesus wants us to be a part of.

One question to seriously ask is “Did Jesus really mean all of this?”

The second question that follows is “Knowing what I now know, what should I do?”

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